NBA Draft 2020: Why Tyrese Haliburton could be the steal of the draft

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NBA Draft

Feb 8, 2020; Ames, Iowa, USA; Iowa State Cyclones guard Tyrese Haliburton Mandatory Credit: Jeffrey Becker-USA TODAY Sports

In two years at Iowa State Tyrese Haliburton has developed from a virtually unknown rotation player into a sure-fire NBA Draft lottery pick.

The 2020 NCAA season was sadly cut short because of the coronavirus depriving players, coaches and fans alike from experiencing the magic of March. More importantly, NBA Draft scouts lost the opportunity to evaluate top-level draft talent against the “best of the best” in college basketball.

The tournament also gives players the ability to showcase their talent on a national stage, specifically athletes who may not be a household name or play for a blue blood program. Of the current lottery prospects, I believe the tournament would have most benefitted Iowa State guard Tyrese Haliburton.

Haliburton entered his freshman year as a three-star recruit with no press or fan fair outside of the Midwest. Even though he received offers from local big-name schools such as Nebraska, Cincinnati, Minnesota and Iowa State, there was uncertainty around exactly what type of impact he would bring to the college level.

Luckily for Iowa State, Haliburton committed in September of 2017. During his freshman season he developed into a ”glue guy” , playing an essential part in the overall success of the team.

As the glue guy, Haliburton was able to earn essential minutes to aid in the development of his game at the college level. During his sophomore season, Haliburton made massive leap from his freshman role, becoming a future NBA lottery pick. He proved that he belonged at the college level and showcased his ability to help his team in all facets of the game.

Prior to his season-ending wrist injury, Tyrese averaged 15.2/5.9/6.5  while shooting 50% from the field, 42% from behind the arc, and 82% on free throws.

So, why is he the steal of the draft?

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